What We Do in the Shadows (film) – Review

WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS Photo Credit Unison Films.jpg

2014’s New Zealand-based vampire comedy What We Do in the Shadows was something of a cult hit, and with good reason. It’s largely the brainchild of Taika Waititi and Jermaine Clement, who appear in the film in lead roles as the vampires Viago and Vlad.¬† The script has a distinctive take on the vampire genre, following the escapades of an ineffective and neurotic group of vampires who live in a squalid houseshare in Wellington, New Zealand. Although the vampires are ancient, ranging from several hundred to many thousand years old, and have conventionally super-human powers, their indolent and impulsive lifestyles prevent them from leading fulfilling lives as they try (and fail) to keep up with the modern world.

What We Do… is filmed in a faux-documentary style, and although the whole thing is executed with tongue firmly in cheek, the film’s unique setting and genuine good-humour set it apart from much of the tediously self-referential horror emanating from within the Anglo-Saxon world in recent years. The fact that Clement and Waititi appear in prominent roles also helps the film, as they are able to bring the right kind of energy and register to their performances; I’m not sure a film of this budget could have secured the right calibre of actors otherwise. Indeed, if you want to be picky (and isn’t that the point of a culture blog?) then you could say that the film’s cast is one of the things that holds it back: a higher budget could perhaps have allowed for more charismatic actors to appear in a wider range of roles. As it is, Clement’s delightful chewing of the scenery carries much of the weight of the film.

The vampires find a lifeline to the contemporary world in the form of Stu, the friend of recently sired vampire Nick. The actor who plays Stu gives an exceptionally naturalistic performance which really helps put across the idea he’s an unusually down-to-earth and nice guy. The film also features some entertaining exchanges between the vampires and a pack of local werewolves, which plays with familiar tropes in the same way as the main story. The werewolf scenes are memorable highlights, and apparently a spinoff centred on this community is in the works, which has some potential.

Werewolves aren’t the only creatures depicted in the film, and one of the central events¬† is the “Unholy Masquerade”, a supernatural ball held in a seedy community centre which is convened by vampires, witches and zombies. The film certainly succeeds in divesting supernatural entities like vampires of their glamour, but at the same time, it also makes them feel strangely sympathetic. Much of the film’s appeal surely resides in that, for a film about the supernatural, its subjects often come across as distinctly human.

8/10